A Minor Alteration

There I stood in front of the mirror, faced with a problem which, I imagine, dates to shortly after the first leafy apron.   You know, the sort of problem where you look in the mirror, and say “I like/love it, but…”  It might be a too-tight or too loose at the waist: The hem might be too long, too short, or uneven: A frill or furbelow might be one too few or too many: A sleeve may be too short, too long, or too baggy.   The garment, be it top or bottom, might just be too too.  Sometimes these problems can be fixed. Sometimes they can’t.     In my case,  the neckline on my newly purchased t-shirt fit great as long as  I stood erect and still, but as soon as I would stoop, or pick up my little sister (who has a penchant for using necklines as handholds) the slits in the top would flap open, and who wants that?

Now, the generally accepted way to fix a neckline that has too deep a V, is to put an insert of coordinating fabric in it. I have seen this be done very poorly. I have not seen it done well, because if alterations are done skillfully, they will be nearly undetectable. Or if noticeable, they will compliment the garment so well that the effect is boutique, and better in design then the original.

I am fortunate in having a mother with a large selection of Friends And Relations who Used To Sew, and have large collections of interesting–and frequently vintage–notions, a few of which have found their way to our house via the post. One of these shippments was entirely of lacey bits– collars and medallions, and what not.  Wouldn’t you know it, there was a practically perfect bit of cotton netting, in a lovely shade of cream. (My  apologies for the lighting. I was doing my alterations the night before I needed the blouse.)

001

It was a simple process to position the lace, pin it on, and hand stitch it to the inside of the blouse.   As you can see in the picture below,  I didn’t get it stitched on quite centered, but it isn’t noticeable at all from the front.

003

See? You wouldn’t know it was altered, would you?

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